Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

In this Discussion

What are your thoughts on NIMH's ending?

I hear a lot of complaints about the "ass pull" ending to the movie; one even went as far as to say it "completely ruined the movie" for him. I personally thought it was a bit of a cop out, but it wasn't anything horrible. It's just a small flaw in an otherwise great cartoon. I think it would have been a little better if Brisby didn't drop the stone in the mud. It would have seemed more like she was the one controlling the stones power and not just: "That magic thing saved the day, HOORAY!"

That's my two cents. What do you guys think?

I don't know how the book ends. I still haven't finished it. :-\"

Comments

  • I don't think it's a movie-ruiner myself, though I count myself among those who think it's a bit of a cop-out. The problem is that if you go by the book ending (which has no magic at all) it would feel anti-climactic, mostly because the book ending isn't very visual and actually focuses less on Mrs. Frisby. (BTW, finish the book! It's awesome!). The movie both focuses on Mrs. Brisby much more than the Rats and is extremely visual, so the idea was that the stone would be a visual representation of Mrs. Brisby's internal courage/power. I think there's probably a way to satisfy this without the Stone, but I'll admit I'd be hard-pressed to think of something as visually impressive. Maybe if the Stone had more of an explanation, it'd be different, but I don't think spewing the magical equivalent of technobabble at the audience would help either.

  • It's not very fan-fiction friendly. I believe "The Secret of the Stone" comes close to adequately explaining it. I just don't feel it's worth explaining. As Simon mentioned, it's good for the movie because it gives us pretty animation. Could it have been done better in the movie? Probably.

  • Not very fan-fiction friendly? Hmmm...wish someone had told me that 28 years ago. :-S

  • DavidLeemhuis said:

    Not very fan-fiction friendly? Hmmm...wish someone had told me that 28 years ago. :-S

    I like what you did with the other-world stuff too. My context for saying that revolves around the fact that I think it's hard to incorporate the stone into a sequel story without making it the focus and sacrificing a decent plot to go with it. You either ignore it, which makes the whole thing weird as it was a big part of the movie. You incorporate it, but only a little bit without explaining where it came from, like Gibbs did (which is probably the best approach). Or you make it the main focus, which I feel can be done, but I feel is not very interesting to delve into. Magic isn't really the most interesting part of NIMH. It's the characters, the story, and the awe (which you can argue magic is a part of, but in reality the magic is really just a MacGuffin put in there for pretty animation and not for story purposes).

    How ironic then that my fan-fic does incorporate magic, but I don't spend my story explaining exactly what it is, but I make it interesting and part of a character's growth. Still not a good story, but hey, I wanted a challenge.

    Your fan-fics are fine, it's one way of approaching NIMH, but not my main focus.

  • ^ I get the distinction, but I think I’ve always tried to make the emphasis in my own fan-fics on character. At the same time I’ve always been bugged by loose ends or too much left unexplained, which is why I felt compelled to explain the magic. :-B

    My own take on the ending? Yes, it was totally out of left field, and mainly put there for the visual punch. But it was also made clear that it was Mrs. B’s own efforts that saved the day.

  • DavidLeemhuis said:

    ^ I get the distinction, but I think I’ve always tried to make the emphasis in my own fan-fics on character. At the same time I’ve always been bugged by loose ends or too much left unexplained, which is why I felt compelled to explain the magic. :-B

    I think that's a cool direction. As a fellow fan-fic writer now, I can totally understand why someone would want to spend more time explaining the magic. It's a major element of the movie that leaves it hanging in the dark as to its interpretation. We've even had that Nostalgic Critic guy give his own take on it in video form.

    Now as a magical element used by a Vietnam widow made by a ruby mined by her late husband? Yeah, that's hard to swallow for me, but I had to include it and I felt (though poorly) that I added it to the character development. You've done some interesting things too like the emotional connection between Mrs. and Mr. B, for instance.

  • You know what? To begin with I first thought this thread was about the VERY end of the movie and that some people were like: "How dare Jeremy find happiness!"

    While I agree that the magical elements of the ending seems to go full on Deux Ex Machina I think it works within the context of the world created by Bluth. Yes, I do think that a little more explanation as to what the stone is, or even where it came from would be welcome, but if you think about it there is more magical imagery in the film.

    I'm not just talking about everyone's favourite rat wizard (present company accepted Simon). Though is there anyone else who would love to see a from the books version of Nicodemus? Anyway, Mrs. Brisby's first impressions of the Rosebush seem somewhat other worldly to her and although we could just put this down to her own awe, it nonetheless gives an impression of the unknown.

Sign In or Register to comment.