I saw Tropes Vs. Women in games and have opinions and things I guess...

I highly recommend you watch Tropes Vs. Women because it's very interesting stuff, even if you do disagree. At the very least, it allows for some thoughtful discussion:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toa_vH6xGqs

Take note that as of this post I have only watched the above video in the three part series, but I feel that I have a good grasp on what she is saying. I don't feel the need to make a post on what I agree and disagree with Anita's stance. Instead, I'm going to add my own thoughts in the mix... and hopefully it'll be comprehensible this time.

I've been playing games basically my entire life. Not until very recently have I begun to think of video games as more than entertainment that I use to kill time. Video games are unique because they are interactive, and therefore have the potential for us to be a part of the story. And it wasn't until recently that I thought much of the term "interactive storytelling." Back 10 years ago, I'd have thought it laughable that video games could be taken as serious media outlet because I was constantly being told they were junk and a distraction and therefore I viewed them as such. When I played a game like Silent Hill 2, I wasn't really thinking how much of an impact the story had on me because let's face it, I was about 10 years old when I first played it. I enjoyed the puzzles and the atmosphere and that was about it. Also it had a guy with a triangle as a face doing naughty things...

I don't know when it happened, but I started caring more and more about video games as a storytelling medium as the years went by. Back in ye olden days of yore, games had little to no story. It really wasn't until last generation of gaming that story was getting more and more relevant in games. Now-a-days it's actually common for people to actually dislike games for not having a good story, something that was unheard of back then. It's kinda cool that people actually give a damn about what goes on in their games so much so that we're now having discussions on how we can make better stories in games. That's why, even if I may not agree with everything Anita says, I think it's at least healthy that it encourages discussion on games.

The video got me thinking interestingly enough on men in video games. Weakness and gentleness is a part of our nature, but it's often viewed in society that it's something that only women should possess. Weakness in men is often viewed as something that has to be overcome and is often seen as a negative trait for men. When you see a man crying or acting scared, it's usually used as a joke or something to be ridiculed. There are exceptions when the men has suffered a loss of some sort, but is that really only when a man could cry or act defenseless? In fact, a lot of the time the loss is considered a motivator for the protagonist to get stronger. This actually happens a lot in games as pointed out by the video. Is it really hard for characters to be portrayed as having both masculine and female characteristics in stories? Not to mention the fact that sexuality and identifications is often almost unexplored in all mediums.

So to conclude, there's plenty of room for growth, but growth can't happen without discussion and discussion is good for thinking and thinking is good for improvement...also big triangle head guy does naughty things.

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